System

organisational systems need to co-evolve with individual and team development

As individuals and teams develop greater complexity of thinking and functioning, the leadership processes, organisational systems and organisation structure needs to evolve to support this different functioning; the evolution of the intangible and the tangible aspects of the individual and the organisation is interdependent.

Goal setting, planning, performance management, recruitment, ... if these systems are designed to too low of a level of complexity, they will hamper transformational efforts

“Best practice” solutions, processes or systems will be insufficient for your needs – you will have to review and redesign specifically for your evolving circumstances; this requires systems thinking and pattern analysis

Requisite structuring consistently describes the various levels of work across the organisation and their relationships with each other.

Requisite structuring assists with effective Design of work

The practical problem of most transformations is the collision point between bottom-up agility-focused work organisation and practices and legacy, conventional organisational hierarchical structures and their attendant control-focused leadership systems. The pinch point is the middle of the management hierarchy, Lv, Liv and Liii.

These are the levels in organisational hierarchies that are most caught in the double bind of financial and strategic (control-oriented) directives from above and the desired organisational practices that will produce agility coming up from below.

As a result these are the layers of the organisation that require the most support in transforming business systems and culture…

AND they usually act as the biggest impediments to that transformation as they struggle with the need to develop more complex ego functioning in the face of the perceived loss of status and power.

As a result, organisational power struggles and unhelpful politics are usually the norm.

This group has the most to lose and the least to gain.